6 Early Warning Signs of Dementia 

6 early warning signs of dementia

Let’s talk about the 6 early warning signs of dementia.

Feeling tired, stressed, lethargic?

You would have all the symptoms of dementia, but do you really have dementia?

Tiredness and stress, may simply be due to late nights, low blood sugar, heavy work load, or any number of things. There are a number of signs that are not real dementia.

The worst thing you could do is give your spouse or partner the wrong diagnosis.

Another trap is the belief you have dementia, but not actually have it. You may have a well-meaning spouse who self-diagnoses you with dementia. He/she then gets into the habit of reminding you when you are forgetful and corrects you when you make a mistake. You then start to think and feel that you actually have early dementia.

It doesn’t mean you have dementia if these symptoms happen occasionally.

early warning signs of dementia

What is dementia?

A mental decline. When certain parts of your brain are shrinking, specifically a structure called the hippocampus.

6 Early Warning Signs of Dementia

1.Poor organization

People with early dementia may have problems with familiar everyday organization tasks. They may get confused with the order of things or with making plans.

2. Personality changes

Having unexpected mood swings where a person switches between emotions for no apparent reason may indicate an early sign of dementia. For no real reason, they may seem different from his/her usual self. They may become irritable, depressed, anxious, agitated, or apathetic.

3.Constipation

Our gut is like a second brain. There is a connection between our gut and our brain. The microbiome (bacteria) in our gut makes neurotransmitters. They also make more serotonin than our brain makes serotonin. Serotonin is a natural mood stabiliser that regulates wellbeing and happiness.

We have more nerve fibers in our digestive system than we do in our spinal column.

Many cognitive problems can stem from our gut. People who have Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease have much higher instance of constipation than someone who doesn’t have these diseases.

However, it is important to note that if you have constipation, it doesn’t mean you have dementia. It is just an early sign.

4.Sensory Dysfunction.

unable to focus

This could include issues with your smell, taste, hearing, eyesight and even your appetite. These could be early signs of cognitive decline. As sensory decline becomes more apparent, then the ability to focus, concentrate and overall memory is really what shows up to be a problem.

5.Language Problems

Struggling to find words for certain things, tending to repeat saying the same things over and over again, or mixing up words are all early indicators of dementia.

For example, a person may be able to talk and make sentences, but is incoherent. What they are saying does not make sense. Words come out randomly and all over the place.  This can be extremely frustrating for the person trying to communicate. Language problems are a result of a shrinking hippocampus.

6.Problems Navigating

Dementia Patient Getting Confused and Lost

Problems navigating are apparent when you are trying to locate a place in a new area. You get confused and can’t work out where you are.

In our brain we have a GPS which allows us to locate where we are in space. When this area of the brain goes down, we lose this GPS. So, our internal map becomes non-functional, resulting in not being able to find out where you are.

Final Comments

Now that you are aware of what the early warning signs of dementia are, the next step is to know how to prevent the onset of dementia. We have published an article with 7 easy things you can do to prevent cognitive decline.

Viewing Dr. Eric Berg DC channel guided much of the content for this article. Dr. Berg specializes in Intermittent Fasting and Healthy Ketosis.

 

Ambiguous Loss in Dementia

Ambiguous Loss in Dementia

When caring for a person with dementia, it is possible to experience ambiguous loss in dementia.

Ambiguous loss can be described as a type of loss an individual feels when a person with dementia is physically there, but is not as emotionally or mentally present as before.

Ambiguous Loss Pioneered by Pauline Boss, Ph.D. explains that this type of loss happens when a loved one is not psychologically present.

This is where a person is cognitively or emotionally gone.

Dementia is a progressive, neurodegenerative, and fatal disease that destroys brain cells. For people who care and love for those with the illness, the ambiguous loss is a constant reminder of how challenging the illness can be.

This kind of loss is not like other types of losses.

Ambiguous Loss, Grief and Dementia

Ambiguous loss in dementia affects everyone

Ambiguous loss is often unclear and has not resolution, closure, or predictable ending. For instance, with death, loved ones know that the person is gone and they can grieve the loss.

With the ambiguous loss, however, individuals are usually at crossroads because there is no certainty of death and it is also not possible to tell whether they will go back to their “normal” selves.

Ambiguous Loss in Dementia Affects Everyone

Ambiguous loss does not only affect caregivers but people with dementia as well. Individuals with the progressive illness are likely to experience feelings of grief and loss over their diagnosis and the changes they go through as the disease progresses through various stages.

Some carers will not recognize ambiguous grief or know how to react when the abilities of the individual with dementia change. This type of grief can confuse relationships and prevent people from moving on.

Recognizing these feelings and understanding the concept of this type of loss can help ease the effects. It is possible to grieve the losses through guidance and support allowing carers to stay connected to the person with dementia while at the same time building resilience and strength.

Understanding Ambiguous Loss

Understanding ambiguous loss

Carers need to get an in-depth understanding of this unique type of loss. It helps caregivers come up with effective techniques to cope with ambiguous loss in dementia and live successfully with all the uncertainties that surround the progressive illness.

Carers have to learn new ways of relating with the person with the illness while becoming more comfortable with the ambiguity. This is especially because it is not possible to control the effects and progression of dementia. At the same time, caregivers have to move on with their lives while looking after the individual with the illness.

Effects of Ambiguous Loss in Dementia

Effects of ambiguous loss in dementia

Ambiguous loss can be a huge stressor for people looking after their loved ones with dementia. It can lead to several negative effects such as:

  • Anxiety and stress
  • Ongoing strain and tension
  • Role confusion
  • Depression
  • Family discord that may result in dysfunctional relationships
  • Caregiver isolation

Managing Ambiguous Loss Positively

Managing ambiguous loss positively

Caregivers, family members, and friends can take several steps to positively live with ambiguous loss in dementia and some of them include:

Reflection

Reflecting on the losses that occur both in the person with dementia and the one looking after the affected individual. Acknowledge this grief, express it, and share it with other persons who will be supportive and understanding. Knowing that a person is not alone when dealing with this type of loss can help offer some relief.

Engage in paradoxical thinking

Paradoxical or dual thinking allows carers to accept the presence and absence that ambiguity presents. It is where a person uses “both/and” thinking instead of “either/or” when dealing with two contradictory ideas that are true at the same time.

This helps people reframe perceptions that they cannot change. “My grandmother has dementia and needs help and I need opportunities to enjoy life” is an example of a paradoxical way of thinking.

Strengthening relationships

Strengthening relationships

Strengthen existing relationships with family and friends is important. At the same time, carers should be open to establishing new relationships that can support and enhance life amid grief and loss.

Where possible, carers should continue with family traditions and celebrations (e.g., holidays and birthdays, etc) making changes where necessary.

Caregivers should also learn to create new rituals that will aid with effective daily living.

Carers should not be afraid of going out to ask for emotional support or hands-on assistance. They should also be ready to share their experiences with others in a bid to help those who may be in a similar position.

Self-care

Eating well, staying physically active, and taking practical steps towards relieving stress are options people have when it comes to taking care of personal needs. Scheduling breaks from care can also help boost morale and health to enable better decision-making and caregiving.

Identify creative outlets

Look for creative and interesting ways to express loss and grief like painting, writing, or other visual forms of art.

Get professional help

Other than reaching out to caregivers, relatives, and friends for support, professional assistance may also come in handy. Options available include well-organized support groups, licensed councillors, and professional organizations like the Alzheimer’s Society.

Celebrate the happy and sad

While grieving what is lost celebrate what has been gained. It is important to always embrace what remains through the various stages of the illness. For instance, while a person may not be able to take long walks or go to the gym, they can still go to the movies.

Ignore what cannot be controlled

It is not possible to control memory loss of a person with dementia but carers can control their reactions.

Closing Remarks

Caregivers looking after people with dementia may struggle with ambiguous loss in dementia. This does not have to be something that wears the carer out. Understanding what this type of loss is and learning how to successfully manage it is instrumental in taking good care of persons living with dementia.

Dementia and Family Stress, Leading to Caregiver Burnout

Dementia and caregiver stress

Watching a loved one’s memory decline in front of your eyes is emotionally tiring and comes with a wide range of daily responsibilities. Someone whom you knew to be mentally sharp, stable, and independent is now becoming less functional, and starts to show many changes in their behaviour and mood patterns. In this article we address Dementia and family stress.

How To Prevent Stress and Burnout in Dementia Caregiver?

Looking after a family member or someone else who has a dementia onset is not just immensely challenging in terms of the responsibilities associated with this role, but also comes with a host of mental and emotional difficulties that often leave caregivers in a deep state of stress and burnout.

In this article, I’ll discuss the causes that lead people, who look after someone with cognitive decline, to experience burnout. I’ll also point out the signs that are worth paying attention to when it comes to this psychological state.

Further, I will also provide some support tips for how caregivers can prevent stress to take over and affect their mental health.

Dementia and Family Stress

Emotional Costs of Providing Care to an Individual with Memory Decline

If you have ever been in the position where you are responsible for an elderly’s health, you know this too well – providing care is not just about feeding, bathing, and administering medication to a vulnerable person.

Most of the time, the stress you experience when you are in a caregiver role has more to do with the emotional and mental impact of the job than with the physical responsibilities per se.

Surely, doing your best to keep your loved one with dementia safe and to make sure they attend their medical appointments does take a toll on your health, however, the real stress comes from other aspects.

Perhaps the distress caused by seeing your loved one’s mental health decline is so overwhelming that you can barely process it for yourself, let alone be strong enough to look after them.

You might stay awake at night wondering if they are going to fall, move away from their room or have an accident. Or perhaps their mood swings, uncontrollable behaviors and anger outbursts are so intense that you are left with very little mental energy to attend to your own life.

No matter what the most vulnerable aspect of the care is for you, it is important to know that feeling tired and stressed is very common among dementia caregivers.

Also, it might be helpful to know in advance how you can best handle burnout if you ever experience it.

Emotional Costs of Providing Care for Dementia

Identifying Signs of Dementia and Family Stress

Alzheimer’s and Dementia are neurodegenerative diseases that require family members and caregivers to be increasingly more involved in the care of the individual affected by them.

As signs and symptoms of dementia advance, the behaviours, personality, and health of the affected individual worsen, making the care more complex and demanding.

This puts increased pressure on family members and caregivers involved in the care process, who are more likely to develop symptoms of stress and burnout.

According to the Maslach Burnout Inventory, burnout is a psychological phenomenon defined by emotional exhaustion, cynicism, increased negativity, depersonalization, and a loss of interest in previously enjoyed things.

It is a common condition amongst caregivers due to the high demands and stresses created by this role.

Although the causes of burnout are complex and not yet entirely understood by research, it is believed that chronic and poorly managed stress is what leads those in a caregiver role to develop burnout symptoms.

It is highly important that all caregivers educate themselves on how to detect the first signs of burnout in order to seek support as early as possible.

Although this condition can show in subtle signs at first, be sure to look out for the following symptoms:

Fatigue

Extreme tiredness that does not go away with usual sleep or rest can indicate that you might be at risk of developing burnout.

Listen to your body and ensure that you give yourself plenty of time to recharge for all the effort you invest into looking after your loved one.

Irritability and mood swings

Due to the constant pressure of having to provide for a vulnerable senior, some people can experience mood changes and irritability.

This can trigger negative responses and impulses towards the people around them.

Lack of concentration

Due to sleeplessness and constant exhaustion, dementia caregivers might find that their concentration is impaired, and their cognitive skills are significantly affected.

Anxiety and depression

These two conditions can often manifest altogether. Some caregivers might feel increasingly worried about their loved one’s future while at the same time experiencing feelings of hopelessness and despair.

Having to figure out so many aspects of someone with dementia’s life can be challenging and frustrating, leading to symptoms of depression and anxiety.

Sleeplessness

Some caregivers might have impaired sleeping problems due to ongoing worries about their loved one. They might feel the pressure to be alert and available at all times, even during the night, which leads to issues with rest and sleep.

Dealing with Caregiver Burnout

It’s true that many family caregivers are so overburdened with responsibilities that they rarely get the chance to prioritise self-care.

Looking after someone with dementia can feel like a part-time job. Research shows that the average caregiver spends around 23.7 hours per week providing care to a loved one.

Besides work and other family commitments, this can really add significant pressure on many caregivers, who are left with the feeling that they need to be available to the loved one with dementia 24/7.

However, the only way of avoiding or coping with first signs of burnout is to prioritise self-care as much as possible.

Dealing with Caregiver Burnout

Me time

Setting time aside to recharge and recover from ongoing stressors is the only way to renew your emotional resources and to continue to be available to the vulnerable person as much as you can.

Failing to look after your emotional needs and to attend to the physical tiredness can backfire on your physical and mental health, which results in resentment and built-up anger. Ultimately, this can lead to a real burnout where you lack physical and emotional reserves to cope with the unavoidable challenges.

Set clear and realistic expectations

Another way of dealing with and preventing burnout is to be as realistic as possible regarding the support you are able to offer to the loved one with dementia.

As neurodegeneration progresses, the complexity of the care needed also increases. As a result, it is almost impossible for one single individual to meet all the needs of a senior with dementia.

Setting clear and realistic expectations on the amount of care you are able to offer can prevent you from experiencing feelings of guilt, self-blame and doubt.

Seek support

Similarly, asking for professional support is highly recommended for dementia caregivers who find themselves overburdened with responsibilities.

If you suffer from mental health conditions like anxiety, stress, or depression, you can get in touch with mental health professionals or counsellors who can help you better manage your resources and cope with daily challenges.

Tips to Manage Dementia and Family Stress

Recognising that the caregiver role brings a lot of stress with it should determine people in this role to implement strategies and measures that make more resilient, such as:

Educating yourself

Being a dementia caregiver requires more skills as the disease of your loved one progresses. As a result, you might want to access training courses of resources that better equip you to deal with the changes in behaviour and personality of the person diagnosed with dementia. It might also be helpful for you to talk to other caregivers about their experience with this matter.

Look after yourself

Prioritize sleep, good nutrition and see your doctor regularly. Prioritize your needs for rest and listen to your body when it needs a break.

Use relaxation techniques

This can be engaging in a hobby that you like or attending a yoga class. Breathing techniques, meditation, and visualisation techniques are also proven as highly effective methods in alleviating stress and tension.

Exercise weekly

Being active relieves mental stress and releases endorphins, a feel-good hormone that increases feelings of relaxation. Research shows that exercise also aids in conditions such as depression and anxiety, which are often found in people who suffer from chronic stress and burnout

Use relaxation techniques

Sort out legal and financial plans

Having all legal and financial aspects sorted can provide comfort to the entire family, thus relieving caregivers of the extra pressure associated with those aspects. Make sure that you involve the individual with dementia in their financial planning and seek legal and financial counsel so that you do not have to worry about these things in the future.

Final Words

Unfortunately, being a dementia caregiver can be a difficult burden to bear even for the most resilient of us.

Therefore, when dealing with dementia and family stress, it is important to ensure that you prioritize self-care and seek mental health support whenever you see a decline in your wellbeing.

Staying in touch with other family members and delegating responsibilities is also a good solution whenever this is possible.

Recognising that the caregiver role can put a lot of pressure on your mental, physical and emotional well-being is the first step in knowing how to access the relevant resources that help prevent chronic stress and burnout.

8 Best Super Foods for Dementia 2022

Best Superfoods for Dementia

Health experts advise persons with dementia to include a variety of superfoods for dementia in their diet daily. Live Science describes foods for dementia as mostly plant-based, but also some dairy and fish that are thought to be nutritionally dense, hence good for a person’s health.

Scientists are continually examining the foods that can enhance cognition and the ones that hinder it. Research shows that what a person eats has a significant impact on brain health.

Hippocrates once emphasised that food should be medicine and medicine should be food. Consuming the right combination of foods can build new brain cells, enhance memory, and perhaps lessen dementia occurrences.

super foods for dementia

Chief policy and research officer at the Alzheimer’s Society, Dr. Doug Brown, said that eating a balanced and healthy diet can reduce the risk of stroke, cancer, and heart disease; thus, it is likely that healthy eating is a great way of looking after the brain.

He also stated that they are still waiting for proof from huge scientific trials to show whether changing diet can reduce dementia risk and by how much.

Check out some of the superfoods that are recommended for persons living with dementia below.

 

Best Super Foods for Dementia

Cruciferous Vegetables and Leafy Greens

Vegetables are not only tasty, but they also have essential vitamins, like B9 and folate, which have proven to reduce depression and boost cognition.

Green vegetables have more vitamins with options like collard greens, kale, spinach, cauliflower, and broccoli being some of the best choices.

Vegetables are also known to be high in carotenoids that can reduce homocysteine levels. This is an amino acid that is linked to dementia, brain atrophy, and cognitive decline.

leafy greens

Berries

Berries like cherries, blueberries, raspberries, and blackberries are a go-to option when looking for fruits that are loaded with antioxidants and help reduce inflammation. Antioxidants are known to help persons with dementia by enhancing cognitive function.

A study released in the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease explains that the level of antioxidants various berries have, may help with reducing plaque build-up in the brain. This plaque is one of the major causes of dementia.

Berries also contain a flavonoid known as anthocyanin that may help slow down the progression of brain damage that is triggered by free radicals.

Investigators also claim that blueberries which are also referred to as “brain food” may activate the region of the brain that controls memory and learning, however, more studies on these are required to substantiate the claims.

berries for dementia

Spices and Herbs

Spices are also included in the list of superfoods for dementia.

These are great because they can be added to meals to enhance flavour without adding any calories or bulk. They also offer a wide range of benefits depending on the spices a person is taking.

Cumin, turmeric, cinnamon, and sage are examples of some spices that help to boost memory, reduce brain inflammation, improve working memory, and reduce brain plaque.

Herbs like rosemary are also known to enhance memory and offer people with dementia protection from cognitive decline.

Other herbs and spices that are proven to be good for brain health include ginger, nutmeg, pepper, and saffron.

Seeds and Nuts

Nuts and seeds are packed with healthy vitamins, protein, fats, and magnesium which are proven to reduce brain inflammation, promote good cognition, and beat off mental decline.

A study reported that ladies over 70 years who eat at least 5 servings of nuts weekly have better brain health than the ones who do not eat nuts.

Seeds like pumpkin seeds, flax seeds, and sunflower seeds are an excellent source of omega-3s, vitamin E, choline, and zinc which can also promote brain health.

Another study published in the Journal of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) studies mice with AD. Some of the rodents were fed a standard diet while others were supplemented with walnuts.

During the period of the study, the researchers uncovered that the mice that were on a standard diet suffered impaired learning ability and memory deficits.

The rodents that were fed on walnuts recorded improvements in learning ability and memory.

nuts for dementia

Avocado

The avocado has also earned its place among the superfoods for dementia.

It is a nutrient-dense fruit that is rich in potassium, folate, fibre, magnesium, and vitamin E. Avocado as a monosaturated fat can reduce the risk of cognitive decline because it can help increase blood flow and lower blood pressure.

The fruit is also said to prevent the formation of brain tangles thanks to the fact that it is rich in folate.

Avocados also pack flavonoids and polyphenols that are anti-inflammatories and help fight dementia.

avocado super foods for dementia

Omega-3

These are healthy fats that may help to prevent and fight dementia. They are commonly found in fatty fish like salmon, mackerel, and tuna.

The fish types are also high in DHA and EPA which are fatty acids that are important for optimal brain health. People can also get omega-3s in flax seeds and olive oil among other sources.

Omega 3 a super food for dementia

Pulses

Pulses like beans and legumes (which can include chickpeas and lentils) are a nutritional powerhouse offering folate, iron, potassium, magnesium.

They are also high in fibre & protein, and low in fat. It is one of the reasons they belong to the category of superfoods for dementia. They also pack a B vitamin known as choline that boosts a neurotransmitter called acetylcholine which is vital for brain function.

The plant proteins have been linked with enhanced preservation of thinking and memory. A study indicated that a lower intake of pulses can lead to an increase in cognitive decline.

pulses for dementia

Eggs

Eggs are among some of the most nutritious foods found in the home, providing people with multiple minerals and vitamins.

Eggs are a great source of choline which helps to repair damaged brain tissue.

A study by the University of Eastern Finland discovered that choline is not only useful in developing memory and the brain, but it might also help to protect people against Alzheimer’s disease and cognitive decline.

eggs for dementia

 

Closing Remarks

Carefully choosing what to eat can have a significant impact on a person’s health. It is one of the reasons the above super foods for dementia come highly recommended.

These brain-boosting foods can help slow down progression of the illness and improve the quality of life for persons with the progressive illness.

 

All-Natural Brain Health Supplement Reviewed

ProMind Complex ReviewedIt is not always easy to source superfood herbs, nor is it, for some people, practical to grow your own herbs. Taking a well-formulated supplement may be the best solution.

ReaDemetia investigated several products that we felt had the ingredients and integrity to be worthy for our audience to consider. One product, ProMind Complex, ticked many of the boxes.

Read our comprehensive review of ProMind Complex HERE.

 

Similar articles:

9 Best Foods to Reverse Dementia in 2021

10 Best Herbs for Dementia and Brain Health 2021

Reference:

Unicityhealthcare.com 

Healthcareassociates.com

BBC.com/news/health

Peoplebeatingcancer.org

Amenclinics.com

Alzheimers.net

Dementia.org 

5 (Best) Natural Remedies For Dementia 2021

natural remedies for dementia

We reviewed plenty of natural remedies for dementia that affected individuals can try out. These five are amongst the more effective ones.

Keep in mind that there is still no cure for dementia but the natural treatments can come in handy to relieve symptoms, enhance the quality of life, and slow down disease progression.

Here are some of the natural dementia treatments you can try out if you are already living with the illness.

Best Natural Remedies for Dementia

1. Turmeric

turmeric
Turmeric is one of the spices that has been used for ages to IMPROVE symptoms of aging including oxidation of cells and inflammation.

The yellow powder is said to have magical anti-inflammatory properties.

Studies in Japan also conclude that it is essential when it comes to improving cognitive function.

It is perhaps one of the reasons cases of dementia are low in Asian countries because they not only use it when cooking but turmeric is a key herb in ayurvedic medicines.

Recent studies also show that it can help enhance some dementia symptoms like the ability to focus, memory loss, and pain that arthritis causes.

2. Massage

massage
There is evidence alleging that that massage can help with the management of an array of dementia symptoms.

These include depression, agitation, and anxiety.

Massage also helps to promote relaxation as the practitioner manipulates the body’s soft tissues with their hands. There are different types of massages which means that a person can choose the one they enjoy the most.

In many cases, massage is used alongside aromatherapy which is the use of certain essential oils that helps ENHANCE cognition and mood in persons who have dementia.

You can add the oils to a person’s bath, applied directly on the skin, or heated in a burner to release a pleasant aroma.

3. Cognitive Stimulation Therapy

cognitive stimulation therapy
CST or cognitive stimulation therapy is one of the natural remedies for dementia.

This is where an individual with dementia gets to take part in group exercises and activities that help to enhance language ability, memory, and problem-solving skills.

Some studies show that CST is most beneficial for persons with mild or moderate dementia.

4. Laughter Yoga

laughter yoga
There is truly no exaggeration to the saying “laughter is the best medicine.” Laughter yoga presents some healing properties to persons who are living with dementia.

It is a combination of medication and gentle cardiovascular exercise.

Participants get to practice deep breathing with physical movements as well as stimulated laughter. It primarily encourages silliness and playfulness which usually leads to contagious real laughter.

The idea was introduced to the world in 1995 by Madan Kataria an Indian doctor. There are MANY BENEFITS that people with dementia get from laughter yoga. This includes improving mood, as well as reducing agitation and anxiety.

Additionally, participants will laugh even when they do not understand the punch line or joke.

5. Routine Physical Exercise

natural remedies for dementia
Depending on what a person can do, it is advisable for everyone who has dementia to get up and move. Exercise is one of the most effective natural remedies for dementia.

It can help treat several dementia symptoms. These include cardiovascular complications, depression, sleep issues, balance and coordination, wandering or restlessness, and cognitive impairment.

Working out is also a great way to get rid of excess weight that can also be the cause of an array of health issues. Keep in mind that you should do all these exercises safely and appropriately.

Closing Remarks

When it comes to natural remedies for dementia, it is important to note that some of them may advertise perks that have not yet been proven by clinical studies or scientific research.

It is, therefore, important to contact your doctor before you start taking anything that claims to help with dementia to be on the safe side.

Summer Heat And Dementia (Best Tips)

summer heat and dementia

We know it is important to discuss summer heat and dementia because hot temperatures present various challenges and dangers to persons with the progressive illness.

This is ESPECIALLY when the hot days in summer seem to be extreme and frequent in nature.

We are lately experiencing this more often.

Individuals with dementia need to stay safe and comfortable throughout the summer heat waves.

A study in New England revealed that there was an association between higher temperature fluctuations and increased risk of dementia hospitalizations.

Thus, we want to share some of the risks that are associated with summer heat and the ideal coping mechanisms.

Risks Summer Heat Presents to Persons with Dementia

risks summer heat presents to persons with dementia
Hot weather can negatively affect seniors in a number of ways.

The most common ones include:

Heat Stress

Also known as hyperthermia this is a group of heat-related conditions that happen when the body’s heat-regulating system does not adequately keep a person cool.

Normal body temperature for a healthy individual during the day ranges from 35.5 to 37.5 degrees Celsius.

Hyperthermia happens when body temperature is more than 40 degrees Celsius according to Physsiopedia.

There are different TYPES of hyperthermia and they include:

  • Heat Syncope (sudden dizziness that occurs after prolonged exposure to heat)
  • Heat-fatigue
  • Heat-cramps
  • Heatstroke
  • Heat-exhaustion

The Centres for Disease Control cites that there are three main reasons individuals who are over the age of 65 are more prone to hyperthermia than the general population.

  • Older people, in general, do not adjust well to sudden temperature changes.
  • Medications that older individuals take for chronic diseases may affect the body’s natural ability to regulate temperature. This can include perspiration generation which is the body’s cooling mechanism. Examples of medications that can increase a person’s risk of heat-related stress include sedatives, diuretics, tranquilizers, and some blood pressure and heart medicine.
  • Older adults are prone to suffering from chronic medical conditions that may affect the way the body responds to heat.

Behavioral Changes

behavioral changes summer heat in seniors
Seniors who have dementia may also showcase behavioral changes and mood swings due to excessive heat.

Some may become more agitated which can be tough if the person is already experiencing anxiety, aggression, and outbursts.

It becomes increasingly important to tend to their emotional needs when dealing with summer heat and dementia.

Dehydration

dehydration during summer heat
Many seniors suffering from dementia do not drink enough fluids in general.

It may not be intentional because some may not even recognize when they are thirsty. In such situations, it is easy for a person to suffer from dehydration.

This can be dangerous because it can result in numerous complications because of toxins that build up in the bloodstream.

Dehydration can also cause STRAIN to the kidney and the liver resulting in urinary tract complications and a host of infections.

Note that some medication can also affect an individual’s dehydration which may result in a drop in blood pressure and risk of fainting and falling.

Avoid this by making sure the affected person sticks to a STRICT schedule of taking medication.

It is also advisable to talk to a doctor about any drug interactions to be on the safe side.

Homeostatic Imbalance

This is another example of how extreme heat can affect seniors with dementia.

The homeostatic imbalance that occurs because of summer heat and dementia often leads to the development of diabetes and cardiac arrest.

Protective Measures

protective measures
There are different ways to protect people with dementia from excessive heat and some of them include:

Air conditioning

Ensure air conditioning is working well.

A professional should check out the system before the hot weather checks in. This is regardless of whether a person lives at home or at a senior center.

In the absence of air conditioning, the rooms should be properly ventilated with fans.

This will AVOID the circulation of humid and hot air in a room.

Keeping blinds and curtains shut can also reduce sunshine that increases temperatures in a room.

Fluids

Another coping mechanism when it comes to summer heat and dementia is to make sure the individual with the illness takes plenty of cool and non-alcoholic fluids.

They should also wear light clothing and take cool baths, showers, or sponge baths.

Additionally, beddings should remain clean and light particularly for individuals who are bedridden. Bed frames can also help with air circulation under the bed.

Invest in helpful items

Another way to protect a person with dementia from heat stress is to purchase items like small electric fans that fit in their bags and are easy to carry around.

Water bottles that alert a person when to take water can also be beneficial.

Regular check-in’s

regular check-ins
If the person with dementia lives alone, it is important for someone whether a relative or caregiver to check up on them every day.

Let the individual lookout for signs and symptoms that are associated with heatstrokes like nausea, dizziness, and disorientation.

Alternatively, the senior with the progressive illness can enroll in an adult daycare or senior center program.

These will offer a safe and cool place for the seniors to pass time.

Avoid going out

It’s simple: Avoid going out during certain times of the day.

Unforgettable states that this is anywhere from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. (hottest time of day).

If the individual has to step out, say for a doctor’s appointment or grocery shopping, it is best they complete errands early morning when it is cooler.

Trying to stay in places that are cool and shady might also help.

Act accordingly

Know how to react in the event of a heat-related illness.

When talking about summer heat and dementia, it is also important to know what to do if a person experiences heat stroke or any other illness that is related to heat.

The affected person should immediately be moved to an area that is cool and has shade.

A wet and cool cloth should then be applied on the armpits, groin, head which are examples of areas that cool fast.

Feet should also be elevated and the person helping should try and fan the individual.

Immersing a person in a tub that has cool water, helping them to a cold shower or sponging can help reduce body temperature.

Remember to seek medical assistance fast while monitoring the individual’s temperature.

Closing Remarks

Going through the topic of summer heat and dementia it is evident that seniors become most vulnerable during extreme weather conditions.

They, therefore, need to be well-protected during this time. Something we can easily overlook.

15 Early Signs Of Dementia (Common) 2021

early signs of dementia

Our extensive research and study allowed us to bring you a list of the most common early signs of dementia.

As soon as you observe regular deteriorations in the condition of a person, you should not really wait for too long.

Instead, act as soon as possible and let the person that shows early signs of dementia see a doctor.

(In some cases, it might be just age-related change.)

Still, if a person is developing dementia, you will be glad that it is really early and appropriate treatment CAN apply to slower the condition.

(Dementia does not happen as part of natural aging.)

In this article, we will look at different changes you should pay attention to and what are some of the early signs and symptoms of dementia.

Common Early Signs Of Dementia

To make your lives easier, we compiled what is considered the most common symptoms of dementia especially when in the super early stage.

1. Temporary memory loss

temporary memory loss
Dementia is the term used to refer to a broad spectrum of symptoms that allude to the weakening of the brain affecting its ability to function properly.

Often the symptoms are quite severe and they affect someone’s daily life. It results from damaged brain cells affecting their normal function to communicate and facilitate different activities of the body.

Temporary memory loss which often affects someone short-term is known to be one of the early signs of dementia. It starts with someone who can often recall events that happened a long time ago suddenly not being able to remember what they had for lunch.

As it affects someone’s cognitive abilities, a person with dementia tends to forget any recently learned information. Even things like dates, events or they cannot help but ask about the same thing repeatedly.

Most find that they have an increasing need to depend on memory aids.

2. Difficulty communicating

difficulty communicating
A person with the condition may have a hard time trying to find the right words to piece together a sentence when communicating. It’s because they often can’t remember the names of items, people or places.

They may not be able to hold a MEANINGFUL conversation to the end since most times they tend to forget simple words or substitute the use of words incorrectly making sentences hard to comprehend.

They may also pause mid-sentence trying to figure out the right vocabulary to use.

What’s more, they also find that they are unable to complete a sentence at all. The result is a lot of repetition making them sound like they are babbling incoherently.

It may also be hard for them to understand those around them and this may become disheartening. To help them, you can simplify your sentences or speak a bit slower or perhaps repeatedly in case they still don’t understand.

3. Increased confusion

increased confusion
Confusion is also one of the early indications of dementia. As the brain cells begin to deteriorate, confusion may occur affecting the person with dementia’s perception of time and place.

As a result, they may not know their whereabouts, how they arrived at certain places and they even forget the way home or easily get lost.

Dementia also causes someone to LOSE track of dates, the passage of time and seasons. If you leave someone with dementia alone for a few minutes to them it may feel like a really long time.

It’s worth noting that at older ages it’s NORMAL to confuse time and dates, however, all factors considered this information often aligns.

However, someone with the disorder keeps suffering from forgetfulness regardless of their age.

4. Challenges performing everyday tasks

challenges performing everyday tasks
Difficulty in performing familiar tasks is also one of the early signs of dementia. As a result of the changes brought about by the condition, abstract thinking becomes quite hard.

Moreover, the person with dementia often shows an unusual struggle performing mental tasks.

People with this disease may at many times find it hard to handle regular everyday tasks that they had previously carried out with ease.

For example, organizing events, planning chores or make simple financial transactions like paying bills become more and more challenging due to the significant decline in brain cognition.

Something as simple as brewing a cup of coffee may prove difficult to someone with dementia because it may be troublesome to follow the right steps.

5. Repetitiveness

repetitiveness
Due to memory loss, people with dementia often end up repeating themselves or lose their chain of thought when holding conversations.

The frequent repetition of activities, questions or statements is a significant sign of reduced cognition.

Sometimes, weariness or anxiety sparks this repetitive behavior. A person with dementia may not remember handling a certain task or previously holding any conversations.

They may repeat the same question several times even after they’ve been answered over and over again.

This happens when the brain’s cerebral cortex which oversees a wide range of functions such as memory and language is damaged or ceases to perform the way it should.

When it comes to repetitiveness, it is also IMPORTANT to educate children about dementia, so they act appropriately.

6. Rapid mood swings

rapid mood swings
Mood swings are also a part of the early signs of dementia and they lead someone to suddenly respond or react irrationally.

It also elicits feelings of fear, anxiety, depression or irritability especially in situations where remembering things becomes quite problematic.

They may also be easily vexed with their colleagues, with friends, at home or in surroundings where they are out of their comfort zones.

This may be quite challenging for caregivers because the person with dementia may behave differently from their usual selves in ways that are hard to explain.

On the other hand, a person with dementia may also be less emotional than they previously were. Plus, their behavior can change SWIFTLY, resulting in rapid mood swings.

7. Poor judgment

poor judgement
Poor judgment is another hallmark of dementia that at times precedes memory loss. A person with dementia is continually unable to make apt decisions.

They may be unable to make the right call in terms of evaluating the different aspects that should be well-thought-out when making an important decision.

If your kin exhibits a pattern of unmistakably wrong decisions or actions such as driving yet they are unable to determine how fast they should go on a highway, chances are they’re suffering from dementia or a similar disorder.

It may be helpful as you cope to consider dementia as a possible reason for their behaviors that seem beyond their control.

8. Withdrawal

withdrawal
Due to the loss of multiple abilities as sparked by dementia the person afflicted soon becomes withdrawn from friends and family.

They also start to display a general lack of interest in activities that they previously found exciting.

A person with dementia may begin to exclude themselves from social activities, hobbies, or even sports that they once loved.

When they are aware of their diminished capacity to handle daily tasks, they may develop poor self-esteem and end up feeling embarrassed or even ashamed.

It leads most to retreat into isolation.

Withdrawal as a symptom of dementia often hits those who are working the hardest. It affects their productivity leading to a decline in their overall performance.

It throws them into a state of sadness and depression.

9. Problems with coordination

problems with coordination
If recognition and coordination complications begin to take effect and affect someone’s everyday life, it could be an early sign of dementia.

A person with the disorder may be clumsy, unhandy, uncoordinated and heavy-handed.

They are not performing tasks with the same ease as they used to. And this means simple things like walking, not to mention running and cycling.

They may also find it difficult to recognize familiar objects like a pot of coffee, cutlery, a cooker, kettle, toothbrush or toothpaste.

Symptoms of a loss of coordination and motor abilities include shaking, struggling to use a hairbrush or shaver and difficulty tying or untying shoelaces.

If, all of a sudden, a person starts to act awkwardly and it goes on for longer than usual, do not leave it behind thinking it will get better.

10. Inability to adapt to change

inability to adapt to change
Difficulty adapting to change is one of the typical early signs of dementia. The inability to recall people’s names or follow what others are talking about can cause nervousness and fear of new changes.

It makes someone with dementia almost obsessive about sticking to their usual routine. On the other hand, they are shying away from trying out new experiences.

Dementia can also alter the way how a person responds to different environments. They may be frustrated and irritated since they cannot follow what’s happening in unfamiliar places.

Disruptive noise, conversations, large crowds, and movements may be overwhelming for them.

Moreover, they find it even more difficult to comprehend information in such surroundings.

11. Neglecting hygiene

neglecting hygiene
Although dementia effects vary from one person to another, it gradually takes a toll on the afflicted individual.

It prevents them from taking care of their daily responsibilities as their cognitive abilities decline. This eventually leads to poor personal grooming and hygiene. Even those who were previously obsessed with their looks and cleanliness are not spared.

As the illness progresses, someone with dementia often starts forgetting to brush their teeth, change their clothes, shower regularly or even use the toilet.

They may not remember the importance of doing all those things.

Depression from the condition could also cause someone to neglect their personal hygiene. At this point, professional assistance is necessary to help them comfortably cope with the activities of daily life.

12. Misplacing items

misplacing items
Many tend to associate misplacing things with the natural aging process. However, this could be one of the early signs of dementia.

Regularly finding supposedly missing items in unusual spots such as locating the remote control in a shoe rack or missing car keys inside the refrigerator are strong indications of the manifestation of dementia.

A person with the condition may easily forget where they kept items such as books or a wristwatch.

They might end up accusing those around them of stealing or hiding their possessions.

They will also emphatically deny it due to their weak memory function and cognitive reasoning. If these underlying concerns are checked out and treated on time, the effects CAN be cured.

13. Lack of abstract thinking

lack of abstract thinking
While we already mentioned trouble with completing everyday tasks and activities earlier, lack of abstract thinking is another early sign of dementia.

There are loads of simple questions you can ask them or even use while observing a person if you notice any changes.

You might not see it the first time, but if a difference in behavior and action happens regularly, a close watch is necessary.

They might have trouble with the simplest mathematical tasks or providing a summary of the article they just read.

Even when reading the instruction for a new gadget, once they are complete, they are still not really sure how to use it.

They might repeat the reading but the end result stays the same – they are unaware of how the gadget operates. Lack of abstract thinking is especially noticeable with how well they manage their finances.

14. Inappropriate behavior

inappropriate behavior
One of the early signs of dementia is inappropriate behavior. This becomes especially evident if a person was behaving in a certain way for the majority of their time, but then they begin to misbehave for no real reason.

If it happens once or twice, even three times, it might not be too big of a deal.

However, if it becomes their repetitive practice, it is highly advisable to see the doctor as soon as possible. Some of the misbehaving acts could be aggression, both physical and mental, arguing and bickering.

One of them is also inappropriate sexual behavior, but that is something we will talk about more in-depth in a future article.

15. Mixing up time and place

miximg up time and place
Since we already chatted about this earlier, it is worth adding it in its own paragraph. While everyone sometimes forgets about what day it is, even where they are going, it is not healthy if this starts happening regularly.

If that begins to occur TOO frequently, it could be one of the early signs of dementia.

Do observe the person as much as possible. Take them to the doctor as soon as possible if this “new forgetfulness” does not go away. Acting early enough and getting treatment before the condition progresses can alleviate it tremendously.

Also, if you happen to be the person who is sensing something “weird” happening to you, again, see the doctor or practitioner as soon as possible.

Lion’s Mane And Dementia (Health Benefits)

lion's mane and dementia

There has been a lot of interest in the topic of lion’s mane and dementia that we received from our users.

Many users are wondering whether lion’s mane offers any health benefits to persons who have dementia.

Can lion’s mane reverse Dementia?

This is based on the fact that the mushroom has been documented to help individuals with several illnesses, including:

Before answering whether lion’s mane is beneficial to persons with dementia, it is important to first understand what lion’s mane is.

It is a type of mushroom that is also known as yamabushitake or hou tou gu according to Healthline.

The nootropic food appears to be white, large, and shaggy resembling a lion’s scruff.

The edible fungus is mostly in use in Asian countries like Korea, China, Japan, and India. Mainly for its medical and culinary uses.

You can eat lion’s mane mushrooms raw, cooked, steeped as tea, or dried.

Also, you can get extracts of the mushroom over the counter as health supplements.

Experts reveal that lion’s mane mushrooms have bioactive substances that are beneficial to the human body particularly the gut, heart, and brain.

We uncover how lion’s mane can benefit persons with dementia below.

Note: Feel free to check our top herbs for dementia if you seek more natural ways to alleviate the condition.

Health Benefits of Lion’s Mane

health benefits of lion's mane
Research focusing on this edible fungus has revealed that it offers multiple health perks.

A study in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry lists numerous benefits of the mushroom saying that it has properties like:

  • Anticarcinogenic
  • Antibiotic
  • Antihypertensive
  • Anti-fatigue
  • Antidiabetic
  • Anti-aging
  • Anti-hyperlipodemic
  • Hepatoprotective
  • Cardioprotective
  • Neuroprotective
  • Nephroprotective

The study also states that the mushroom enhances cognitive function, depression, and anxiety.

These are common symptoms that persons with dementia have. Very likely the cause that pushed the study of lion’s mane and dementia.

Ways Lion’s Mane May Help Individuals with Dementia

ways lion's mane may help individuals with dementia
People with dementia might benefit from lion’s mane in several ways like:

Boosts Brain Function

Research on this mushroom indicates that it may have a significant impact on neurodegenerative diseases like dementia.

One of the ways lion’s mane affects the function of the brain is through enhancing neurite outgrowth according to research published in the International Journal of Medicinal Mushrooms.

This outgrowth can potentially reverse or slow down cell degeneration in the brain which is a character of illnesses like Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s (different types of dementia).

The mushroom can help improve memory

Animal research published in Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine revealed that the mushroom helped to improve memory in mice that had Alzheimer’s and those that did not have.

It also stimulated cognitive function.

A medical trial conducted in Japan affirmed that the edible mushroom helps to improve cognitive function in women and men aged 50-80 years.

Participants of the study took a lion’s mane tablet 3 times a day for 16 weeks. Researchers then continued to observe them for 4 more weeks.

The experts observed that the persons who took lion’s mane scored higher on the cognitive function scale than the group that was on the placebos.

The authors of the study were confident that the mushroom offers an effective treatment for mild cognitive impairment.

Enhance Digestive Health

Lion’s mane is known for its strong anti-inflammatory properties and it may improve the function of the stomach and the digestive system.

Molecules in the mushroom also help to relieve and prevent oxidative stress that is caused by exposure to chemicals in the environment and poor nutrition.

Improve Mental Health and Well-Being- Lion’s mane supplements might help people feel better by reducing mental health effects and improving sleep.

Consuming the mushroom may also be a natural way of treating anxiety and depression.

Furthermore, studies also indicate that the mushroom can enhance immune function.

May Help Protect Against Dementia

lion's mane might help protect against dementia
Studies reveal that the lion’s mane mushroom has two special compounds, erinacines and hericeones. These stimulate the growth of brain cells.

Animal studies also report that the mushrooms may help protect against the development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD).

To further talk about lion’s mane and dementia, it’s essential to note that the mushroom and its extracts have been shown to reduce memory loss symptoms in mice.

Researchers also state that it helps to prevent neural damage due to amyloid-beta plaques that accumulate in the brain during AD.

Closing Remarks

Many studies on the subject of lion’s mane and dementia still try to figure out if the mushroom is beneficial for people living with the progressive illness.

This means more research still needs to be done to offer more conclusive results on the protective benefits of the mushroom on the brain.

Always talk to your doctor first before starting taking any supplements.

10 Best Herbs for Dementia & Brain Health 2022

herbs for dementia

Through the years, we have studied and tested several herbs for dementia that you can use for people with the illness.

These are GREAT to improve brain health and even treat memory loss.

Some of these herbs have been studied for their effect on dementia and others have been tested for the effect they have on cognition which is the mental process involved in understanding, thinking, remembering, and learning.

Best Herbs for Dementia

Here are some herbs that may be beneficial for natural dementia treatment.

1. Sage

Many people recognize this herb for its PUNGENT smell.

Studies reveal that sage might also help treat dementia and enhance cognition.

One of the research reviews that was published back in 2017 stated that sage is rich in compounds that are beneficial for both neurological and cognitive function.

2. Rosemary

Rosemary is indeed a great herb for cooking different cuisines.

What you may NOT KNOW is that this herb with a lovely smell also contains some anti-inflammatory properties that can assist with memory issues.

It produces similar results to those of numerous Alzheimer’s drugs.

A controlled study with seniors showed that rosemary promotes memory and performance.

Another way persons with dementia can use rosemary is through aromatherapy where they get to utilize the potential of the herb’s potent essential oil.

3. Ginseng

ginseng
It is NOT possible to mention herbs for dementia without talking about ginseng.

The herb has numerous benefits that include reducing inflammation, improving brain function, and reducing stress levels.

A high percentage of people with dementia will benefit from ginseng treatment as it is known to CLINICALLY improve cognition.

4. Turmeric

Turmeric is rich in a compound known as curcumin which has anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects.

These are two major factors that not only benefit brain health but your OVERALL health as well.

A review that was published in 2010 research suggests that turmeric may stave off dementia and boost brain health by getting rid of a protein fragment known as beta-amyloid.

Note that the build-up of these protein fragments is what leads to the formation of Alzheimer’s related BRAIN PLAQUES.

Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia.

Additionally, turmeric may help to inhibit the breakdown of brain nerve cells which, in turn, protects brain health.

5. Salvia

salvia
Also known as red sage root or dan shen, this is an essential herb in Chinese medicine.

Traditionally, it was mostly administered for its CALMING effect.

Modern scientific experiments disclose that salvia is helpful when it comes to enhancing microcirculation by dilating blood vessels which then improves blood circulation.

In addition to this, it can also help to slow blood clotting.

6. Ashwagandha

ashwagandha
This is another plant that makes it on the list of herbs for dementia.

It belongs to the tomato family and is native to the dry regions of Northern Africa, India, and the Middle East.

For years, it has been a staple for ayurvedic medicine because it PROMOTES healthy sleep, fights disease, and restores energy.

Recently, studies have shown that it also has the potential to improve memory and learning.

Ayurvedic practitioners recommend the herb as an agent for FIGHTING FORGETFULNESS and as a brain booster.

Researchers at Newcastle University reported that ashwagandha inhibits the formation of beta-amyloid plaques.

These are the plaques that accumulate in the brains of persons with neurodegenerative illnesses like dementia and are known to be toxic to cells in the human brain.

Scientists at the National Brain Research Centre also tested the herb on mice with Alzheimer’s.

The mice recorded IMPROVED cognitive performance after 20 days of undergoing treatment.

After 30 days, the study reveals that the brain function of the ill mice returned to normal and the amyloid plaques that were in the mice’s brain reduced significantly.

7. Ginkgo Biloba

ginkgo biloba
When talking about herbs for dementia we absolutely need to mention Ginkgo Biloba.

Commonly taken in TCM (Traditional Chinese Medicine), the herb has been used for a LONG TIME to treat dementia.

The experts who advocate for Ginkgo Biloba claim that it helps to promote blood flow by stimulating circulation something that enhances cognitive function.

Conclusive research still needs to be done on the herb because studies generate MIXED results.

8. Gotu Kola

gotu kola
In popular alternative medicine systems like TCM and Ayurveda, Gotu kola has been used to improve mental clarity for a long time.

Animal-based research also confirms that the herb can help fight oxidative stress which is beneficial for brain health.

A preliminary study that was published in 2003 in Clinical and Experimental Pharmacology & Physiology states that tests of rats concluded that Gotu kola has the potential to stop oxidative stress associated with Alzheimer’s, and it may also BOOST cognitive function.

9. Lemon Balm

Most people will consume lemon balm in tea form to ease insomnia and anxiety.

These are TWO SYMPTOMS that are common with dementia.

Studies show that this herb can also heighten cognitive function reason it is listed among herbs for dementia.

A study published in 2003 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery, and Psychiatry explained that 42 patients with Alzheimer’s took lemon balm extract or a placebo for 4 months.

When the study came to an end, it was recorded that those who were taking lemon balm showed improvements in cognitive function when compared to the ones who were on the placebo.

10. Huperzine A

huperzine a
In China, it is estimated that more than 100,000 individuals with dementia have been treated using Huperzine A.

They use it to treat AD and other types of dementia in the region. It is extracted or manufactured from club moss extract.

TRADITIONALLY, they mainly use it to treat inflammation and fever.

The herb has also been known to reduce cell injury from epilepsy, strokes, and other disorders.

Comparison Table – Herbal Supplements

 PRODUCTINGREDIENTS (PER/SERVING)CHECK PRICE
Agobi 9 in 1 Brain Support Herbal SupplementAGOBI 9 in 1 Brain Support Herbal SupplementRosemary 30mg
Ginseng 50mg
Ashwagandha 200mg
Ginko Biloba 70mg
Gotu Kola 100mg
Amazon Buy Cat Food
Mend Support Daily SupplementMEND Daily Support SupplementTurmeric 300mg
Ashwagandha 250mg
Amazon Buy Cat Food
Naturewise Curcumin TurmericNATUREWISE Curcumin TurmericTurmeric 2250mgAmazon Buy Cat Food
Herbamama SageHERBAMAMA Sage CapsulesSage leaf 1000mgAmazon Buy Cat Food
Mary Ruth Lemon BalmMARYRUTHS Organics Lemon Balm dropsLemon BalmAmazon Buy Cat Food
Huperzine A Supplement for dementiaNUTRICOST Huperzine A CapsulesHuperzine A 200mcgAmazon Buy Cat Food

Closing Remarks

The use of herbs and natural remedies is quite promising when it comes to early treatment of dementia and other conditions that involve poor memory.

While taking herbs for dementia may be considered beneficial for the brain, it is important to seek medical advice before you START taking the herbs so that you can get the GREEN LIGHT on whether to continue or not.

Keep in mind that it is best to add small amounts of herbs and spices to your food or beverage.

More is not necessarily better as it can lead to adverse side effects, especially when it comes to spicy food.

Finally, you can GROW many HERBS AT HOME, too.

For this, we prepared a full article on how to grow a therapeutic indoor garden.

 

All-Natural Brain Health Supplement Reviewed

ProMind Complex ReviewedIt is not always practical to grow your own herbs. Taking a well-formulated supplement may be the solution.

ReaDemetia investigated several products that we felt had the ingredients and integrity to be worthy for our audience to consider. One product, ProMind Complex, ticked many of the boxes.

Read our comprehensive review of ProMind Complex HERE.

13 Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease Symptoms 2022

creutzfeldt jakob disease symptoms

Today, we will look at some of the most common Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms and signs of which you should be aware.

Let’s face it, went it comes to CJD, it is important to treat the condition as early as possible.

If it is your first time hearing of the disease, read along.

First and foremost, Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease or short CJD is a destructive brain disorder that leads to dementia and even death.

However, CJD is not that common and affects approximately one person in every one million per year. A person with the disease can die within a year.

First, in the early stages of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease, a person begins lacking memory, their vision gets blurry and even starts behaving out of place.

But these are just some of the symptoms of CJD. Moreover, when the condition progresses, a person can fall into a coma, get blind, depressed and experiences difficulty swallowing.

In short, CJD appears when prion protein gets damaged and deformed. When healthy, this protein does not cause any inconvenience to the body.

But everything changes drastically when prion does not perform as it should.

The main Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms

1. Behavioral changes

behavioral changes
Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD) is a deadly neurological disease that progressively destroys brain cells by creating small holes in the brain.

It is known to occur when prion protein that communicates message among different brain cells are damaged.

Once prion proteins are affected, they fold into an abnormal shape and in turn, they don’t function how they normally would.

When it affects the nervous system, someone experiences a series of signs and symptoms that require instant attention and care.

Some of Creutzfeldt-Jakob’s disease symptoms are psychological-based. The person affected by the illness displays a rollercoaster of behavior and emotions due to mental impairment and it gets worse with time.

2. Memory Impairment

memory impairment
When the damaging brain cells appear, the cognitive actions of individuals suffering from Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease deteriorate rapidly.

The affected person develops dementia where their memory becomes problematic and this affects their thinking skills as well.

Since the brain is incapacitated and unable to perform fully, the affected person is susceptible to confusion, disorientation and poor planning because they cannot think critically.

The person is unable to recall any recent events or exhibit general knowledge of simple things related to their surroundings.

It throws them into a state of disintegration and restlessness. With time, it may turn into distress or even depression.

3. Coordination Difficulties (Ataxia)

coordination difficulties ataxia
Difficulties with physical coordination is also another common Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptom.

As the illness progresses, the person with the illness develops neuromuscular defects leading to coordination dysfunction, voluntary muscle loss, and lacks of rhythm.

It happens because of the weakening of muscles and muscle mass loss, especially around the arms and legs. As a result, balance and coordination prove challenging affecting the ability to control different body parts.

Overall, it affects how someone speaks and they suddenly develop challenges walking comfortably. The assistance of a caregiver is necessary to lend them a hand to help them move around.

At the later stages, the person with the disease may suffer from the total loss of their physical and intellectual capabilities and they eventually slip into an unconscious state.

4. Slurred speech

slurred speech
Rogue prion protein damages the brain cells, making their communication ineffective. The speech of the affected person becomes incomprehensible and impaired.

They find that they are unable to communicate clearly to those around them or their caregivers. Their ability to express themselves becomes stunted or totally halted.

The reason is that a muscle tone known as hypotonia diminishes and also the tongue muscle weakness. It can even lead to facial paralysis.

When in such a state, the person with the disease may retreat into a state of isolation and despair as a result of the inevitable changes that their body is undergoing.

5. Impaired vision

impaired vision
One of the other Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms is vision impairment or total blindness. The visual signs are marked by complex visual disturbances, cortical blindness, supranuclear palsies, hallucinations, and diplopia.

When the infectious prion proteins are deposited on the cornea’s lymphoid tissue, which controls the immune response in the eye’s frontal section, the proteins damage the cortical region.

The damage results in poor vision or even hearing or seeing things that don’t really exist.

If the person with the disease develops blurry vision, it is a result of cortical damage and it may trigger discomfort making it crucial to visit an eye specialist for lasting solutions.

6. Increasing Confusion

increasing confusion
Due to memory loss and disturbed cognitive processes, a person suffering from CJD is likely to experience rapid confusion and feel overwhelmed by their current state.

They often acknowledge to themselves that they are unable to live their lives fully as before.

As another common Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptom, confusion leaves the affected person frustrated due to visual disturbances that make them unable to recognize simple things like their surroundings or how to get back home.

It causes them to wander around aimlessly and also feel unsafe in unfamiliar surroundings.

People with the disease often lose track of time and seasons so they require full-time care and guidance to handle their daily tasks.

7. Depression and Rapid Mood Swings

depression and rapid mood swings
As a result of the Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease taking a toll on someone battling with the illness, their mood tends to oscillate rapidly.

One moment they are happy and excited and the next minute they are agitated and irritated by their surroundings or situations that they previously enjoyed. The unexpected change sparks frustrations making them lapse into depression and despair.

They also become easily irritable and develop poor personal grooming and a loss of appetite leading to weight loss.

When out of their comfort zones, people with CJD tend to easily become upset. They may also exhibit inappropriate emotional responses like laughing when they receive or relay bad news or crying for no reason.

This may also leave their caregivers frustrated because the person becomes difficult to handle sometimes.

8. Withdrawal

withdrawal
People suffering from CJD tend to isolate themselves and withdraw from family and friends. To them, the usual activities or hobbies that they previously enjoyed no longer excite them.

It often stems from their inability to respond to social cues or the decline of their motor skills which makes them unable to perform or participate in any task.

It makes them feel embarrassed and this results in low self-esteem which makes them prefer to retreat to seclusion.

Also, being unproductive causes psychological distress to the persons with Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease so they choose to be by themselves.

The changes experienced during the course of the illness bring about an overall personality and behavioral change and it is wise to approach the person with the disease with utmost care.

9. Swallowing Difficulties

swallowing difficulties
The diminished performance of different body parts arises when the damaged brain cells stop functioning as they should also affect the muscles around the mouth.

It may make swallowing problematic and this may lead to malnutrition.

For instance, if the swallow reflex or the coordination of the throat muscles are affected, the affected person finds it hard to chew or move food in the mouth while at the pharyngeal stage.

At this stage, the tongue pushes the food back to the mouth triggering the swallow reflex as the windpipe closes briefly.

It poses an even greater risk of choking which could prove fatal. For sufficient nourishment, the caregivers should consider perennial feeding and consult with a physician.

10. Abnormal gait/walking

abnormal gaitwalking
Abnormal walking or gait is one of the other Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms that are common. It comes about due to the communication breakdown between the muscles and the brain.

As the nervous system is damaged, the body is unable to control intricate synchronized movements affecting normal walking.

Since normal walking requires the collective help of systems that oversee coordination, strength, and sensation, someone with CJD is often unable to sustain normal movements.

Also, the body of the person with the disease is unable to maintain a rigid posture; they experience unsteadiness and difficulty in balancing physical configurations as a normal person would.

11. Issues With Bladder and Bowel Control

issues with bladder and bowel control
When the communication between the brain cells that facilitate bladder and bowel function weakens, it leads to issues with bladder or bowel control.

As a result, someone with CJD may experience instances of uncontrolled urine or stool passage. When the brain cells are unable to communicate on when to contract the sphincter or rectal muscles, urinary or fecal incontinence is inevitable.

It often starts as leakage when passing gas and as the illness progresses the situation worsens. In such situations, the caregivers turn to products like diapers or tiny plugs to handle the situation.

However, if cases worsen or progress medical intervention is necessary.

12. Difficulty Sleeping

difficulty sleeping
While you might not have any of the signs mentioned here, have you taken a look at your sleeping behavior?

Chances are, you are experiencing insomnia and you are not even aware of the consequences it brings.

Indeed difficulty sleeping is one of Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms which you should pay close attention to.

In other words, if you find that sleeping is troubling you and is not as quality as it used to be, you better talk to your doctor for any possible additional examination.

Let’s face it, without a good solid 7-8 hours worth of sleep, the long-term effects on our body can be catastrophic.

13. Numbness

numbness
When it comes to Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms, one of them is numbness that can occur in some parts of the body.

Whether it’s fingers on hands or feet or even the whole arm, it can happen that a patient loses a sense of feel.

Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease symptoms conclusion

As a caregiver or even a family member, you should always pay close attention to all kinds of changes in the body, both physical and mental.

Those small shifts can help take action early enough to prescribe the right treatment and alleviate the condition.

In the majority of cases, we act almost too late, so make sure that’s not you. Let these symptoms help you discovering Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease as soon as possible.

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